Snowboard bindings

A snowboard setup consists of three elements - the snowboard, snowboard boots and bindings. Snowboarders attach great importance to boards and boots, but neglect bindings. Right off the bat, it's rarely a good idea to choose the cheapest option and not worry about bindings. The right bindings guarantee maximum control, comfort and precision, optimize your riding experience and the wrong bindings will ruin your whole day in the snow.
You are connected to your board through the binding and transfer your power and movements to the snowboard. You  are probably wondering why the price difference between basic and high-end bindings is huge. Without going into too much detail, the more expensive, the more comfortable and efficient at the same time.

Read further below our buying guide for bindings....

[read more]

A snowboard setup consists of three elements - the snowboard, snowboard boots and bindings. Snowboarders attach great importance to boards and boots, but neglect bindings. Right off the bat, it's... learn more »
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Snowboard bindings

A snowboard setup consists of three elements - the snowboard, snowboard boots and bindings. Snowboarders attach great importance to boards and boots, but neglect bindings. Right off the bat, it's rarely a good idea to choose the cheapest option and not worry about bindings. The right bindings guarantee maximum control, comfort and precision, optimize your riding experience and the wrong bindings will ruin your whole day in the snow.
You are connected to your board through the binding and transfer your power and movements to the snowboard. You  are probably wondering why the price difference between basic and high-end bindings is huge. Without going into too much detail, the more expensive, the more comfortable and efficient at the same time.

Read further below our buying guide for bindings....

###
For you, we summarize the most important info and facts in our snowboard binding buying guide to help you better understand why bindings are so important and how they work - and to help you find the right binding for your snowboard, riding style and needs.

We'll answer the question, "What's important when choosing a binding?" so that you can find your perfect snowboard binding with us.

A quick summary beforehand: the higher priced bindings are generally better padded, have a softer cushioning system, straps as well as an ergonomic spoiler, etc. Beyond that, of course, you're paying for performance and durability. An aluminum base plate, buckles and spoilers made of urethane are of course more than the plastic equivalent - and therefore more expensive. High-quality materials respond more directly to your movements and are much more reliable. An uncomfortable fixation, on the other hand, quickly causes painful pressure points on the straps and also quickly hinders blood flow, which can become a nightmare on descents. So it may well be appropriate to fork out a few euros more and in return have a good feeling on your feet all day long. If you only snowboard a few days a year, you may not care.  If, on the other hand, you are one of those riders who venture out on the snow several weeks a year, you definitely don't want blisters and calluses on your feet. If you have any questions after our guide, you can always contact us by mail or phone.

 

What are the different elements of a snowboard binding?

 

HIGHBACK SPOILER

 

Buckles

You can easily and practically close the binding with a ratchet system. In most cases, a few hand movements are enough for a secure hold of your snowboard boot. The material selection is quite large and ranges from the simple plastic buckle for entry-level models to aluminum or magnesium buckles for

The Highback (Spoiler): The highback is the vertical plate behind the bottom of your calf.

It supports you in turns and transfers your power to the board.

The spoiler is available in different materials and in different heights and flex levels.

Polycarbonate is a common spoiler material and can be made in a variety of ways to provide versatile freestyle freedom. Polycarbonate is an inexpensive but practical material because flex and torsional stiffness can be fine-tuned.

Urethane is a compound that allows extreme torsional flexibility in your highback. These highbacks are typically used in freestyle or jib-oriented bindings, as they allow the binding to flex laterally with the boot while still providing good control.

Carbon is the top material and is mainly used for freeride bindings because of its power and precision. Such a binding offers incredible resonance across the board and will put every bit of energy directly onto the board. Carbon fiber has the added benefit of being much lighter than polycarbonate and urethane.

Generally speaking, shorter and/or softer highbacks work well for freestylers and beginners. They offer great freedom of movement and provide fun and flexible riding.

Higher and stiffer spoilers, on the other hand, are for freeriders and advanced riders. They offer control, precision and responsiveness, but are also physically demanding.

Highback adjustment

To create better edge pressure, there is the option of a forward tilted position. To do this, the spoiler is adjusted so that it is stiffer and the rider bends the knees more. Up to 30° are possible here. The more you adjust the spoiler vertically, the more tolerant your board is and your boots have more freedom.  

The spoiler can also be adjusted vertically. If you align it parallel to the board edge , you get an even more direct power transmission to the heel edge. 

However, there is no right or wrong way to choose a highback. In the end it depends on your personal feeling. Even some freestylers like higher highbacks and powder fans go for the more flexible variant. You are spoiled for choice!

The Heelcup

This is the connection between the highback and the baseplate. The name says it all: it encloses the heel. Some bindings are one-piece and the heel cup is only an extension of the baseplate. In other bindings, it is a separate component and can be adjusted back and forth according to your needs. The heel cup transfers your power to the base, which in turn transfers it to the board. A rigid heel cup is therefore synonymous with great responsiveness.

The Baseplate : It is the soul of any binding, the central element.

The baseplate, often called the "frame", creates the direct link between you and your snowboard. When it comes to the material, there are no limits and you will find baseplates made of plastic as well as aluminum and other metals. The chassis transfers your power quickly and precisely to the, but at the same time absorbs shocks and impacts, for example, when landing, changing or simply accelerating. As with the spoiler, the base plate has a stiffer chassis for responsiveness and control, while a softer chassis promotes tolerance and movement. 

The Footbed : It is part of the chassis and is that part where your foot is embedded.

Footbeds are often cushioned with EVA foam, but you'll find other cushioning systems such as air cushioning among the bindings. The insole absorbs shock, for example, when you land. Sometimes the insole is slightly inclined to create an angle between the ankles, knees and thighs. This way, you'll be as comfortable as possible on the deck and your legs won't get tired as quickly while riding.

Straps:

Most bindings come with two straps: a toe strap and an instep strap. With the ankle straps, you get pretty much the same thing: they enclose the instep keeping your shoe in the right position to transfer power directly to the board. High-quality straps are padded to do this, reducing pressure points and preventing pain.

 

Toe straps, on the other hand, can vary quite a bit:

 

ride_2122_C9_BLACK-9IeUzi9j0Xk7rE

 

 

The classic toe strap lays directly over your toes. Thus, it holds your foot in the footbed. This rather simple construction is outdated and offers a little less security and support than other straps. That's why you don't find it too often anymore.

 

 

836445-002_ZERO_BLACK-CAMO0010

 

 

The Cap Strap is more modern and safer. It wraps around the front of the boot, so in front of your toes and pushes it into the heelcup.

 

 

Flow-NX2-GT-Fusion-Black-at-board-sport-en

 

 

Sometimes you can find bindings with only one wide and large strap instead of two single straps. This variant is used for tail entry bindings. This strap surrounds the entire boot and provides a strong and comfortable hold.

 

 

What types of snowboard bindings are there?

Strap-in snowboard bindings

are still the most popular bindings in the snowboard world. They have two straps , a baseplate and a highback.

You step in from the front and place the snowboard boot on the footbed and the calf against the highback. Tighten the straps and off you go. This system is not the fastest , but it is safe, practical and powerful. Strap bindings can be easily adjusted for riding comfort, for example with spoilers and adjustable soles.

Tail entry bindings

have come onto the market some time ago and really pack a punch with their innovative design. Getting in and out of the bindings is incredibly easy and quick. The highback can be lowered, so you just have to slide into the binding without having to touch the straps. To close the binding, simply pull up the highback and lock it. It only takes a few seconds and you're ready to go. The first few times can be a little tricky, but fast entry bindings will quickly earn you a priceless price. These days, the vast majority of rear-entry bindings are called hybrid bindings, which means you can just as easily use them the classic way.

Step-In Bindings

If you want a quick and easy connection to your snowboard, then the Step-In system is for you. You can step into the binding right off the lift with your clicker boots. Then you hear a click, adjust a lever on the base and you're ready to go. It doesn't get any easier or faster than that.
Please note that the different systems are NOT compatible with each other. 

CLEW - the most innovative snowboard binding combines the advantages of a strap binding with the convenience of a quick and easy step-in system. The CLEW system can be connected to or attached to ANY boot and has its own integrated highback and a handle that can be operated without much effort.

Clew snowboard binding-CLEW-20 liftClew-Snowboardbindung-CLEW-20-11616715_9Clew snowboard binding-CLEW-20

 

 Function-Clew

Which binding is best for which use?

Freestyle snowboard bindings

Freestyle snowboard bindings are generally more flexible, cushioned and have a sloped footbed. They feature a short, asymmetrical spoiler and an emphasis on flex and lightness. The thought behind it: You should have as much mobility as possible. The shorter spoilers are more forgiving and have a soft lateral flex for your presses and holds. Basic rule: the more agile the overall package, the easier your tricks.

Celia_Petrig_Laax_Rohrbacher21_50-1

Freeride snowboard bindings

Freeride bindings are the most powerful of all. They are stiff and precise, and their high highbacks focus on high responsiveness. Designed for punchy riders who care about maximum control. Freeride snowboard bindings are often made of carbon or other stiff materials.

Nitro_Products_Hintertux_Rohrbacher20_45-1

All-mountain bindings/all-round bindings

All-mountain bindings or all-around bindings are a mix between freestyle and freeride bindings. Not too soft and not too firm, but with a medium flex, so you can take a spin through the powder in the morning and then have a fat session in the park. A favorite playground these bindings do not have. On both hard and soft snow, the combo bindings perform and are true multi-taskers. You are not limited by your binding in your riding style!

Dominik_Wagner_Flachauwinkl_Rohrbacher21_152

Flex of snowboard bindings

In snowboarding, we often talk about "flex" or "stiffness" in terms of equipment. In snowboard bindings, flex represents the mobility of the materials used and the construction of the binding. Ultimately, the combination of these influences whether your binding is either soft, medium or hard.

Soft - Flex Level 1-4

Softer snowboard bindings are made of more flexible materials, e.g. plastic,  and are ideal for any beginner, as they are more forgiving of mistakes due to their higher flexibility. A more flexible highback allows the rider to perform heelside turns more easily. For freestyle and jibber riding, softer bindings are often suitable for several reasons - firstly, as these bindings are more forgiving of mistakes, especially on bigger landings, and secondly, the high flexibility opens up more opportunities to perform presses and grabs.

Medium - Flex Level 4-7

Medium bindings are the all-rounder. Whether advanced snowboarder who appreciates the extra support for stability and better control, or all-mountain rider who appreciates the unlimited versatility in terms of the field of application and riding style offers the medium-stiff bindings. An aggressive freestyler and jibber seize the opportunity to go above and beyond and get brilliant feedback from the binding.

Stiff - Flex Level 7-10

If you love fast pistes and carving, then you appreciate the precise control and fast responsiveness of stiff bindings. The binding transfers your movements quickly and efficiently to your board. You have a secure grip and can go full on the edge. Generally, equipment with a harder flex is suitable in the terrain.

 

Which binding is compatible with my snowboard?

Most snowboards use one of two systems. There is the 2x4 and the 4x4 insert system for your bindings.

At brettsport.de all boards, boots and bindings are compatible with each other. We only sell components that match each other, so you can enjoy your sport. If you are unsure or have any concerns about compatibility, just give us a call or send an email to info@brettsport.de

2x4 binding system

The 2x4 system is probably the most used on the market and compatible for almost all bindings.
Here the 2 cm stands for the vertical distance between each insert. The 4 cm for the lateral distance between two insert rows. A deck in the 2x4 system usually contains 12 inserts for each foot.

4x4 binding system

Then there is the 4x4 system which is similar to the 2x4 system and is built on the same principle.
You can position the disc of your binding over the holes as you wish, usually choosing 8 inserts per foot.

How do I choose the right binding size for my snowboard binding?

Snowboard bindings are available in sizes - Small S / M, Medium M / L Large L / XL etc. It is important that you choose the right size for your boots. Manufacturers sometimes give more specific information in CM or MM. It's best to read through the size information on the respective product page. We try to provide as much information as possible. Sometimes it is also worthwhile to look at the manufacturer's size chart at the manufacturer directly.

After you have checked the manufacturer's size chart, you should check whether the binding fits your shoe size.

Now when you have the binding and boot in front of you, put your shoe in the binding as if you were strapping yourself in. The boot should not hang out of the binding excessively, the straps should not be painfully tightened and should not have any slack left. If the strap does not reach the ratchet , it may need to be adjusted - the binding straps can be adjusted on either side to center the strap on the shoe.

The heel should sit firmly in the binding.
With a properly adjusted binding, the boot should be able to flex, but not wobble.
If you have comfortable boots that fit well in the binding with no slack, you've made a good choice.

bindings_snowboard

Please remember: Any recommendations for specific styles or terrains and rider levels are only guides that you can use as a guide, but they don't necessarily apply to you. Some freeriders appreciate mobility and prefer a binding where they are willing to compromise on precision. And some freestylers, on the other hand, want a responsive binding. Snowboarding is all about the personal feeling on your feet. Our tip : If possible, just try concepts before buying bindings and see if a softer, stiffer or medium is better

 

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For you, we summarize the most important info and facts in our snowboard binding buying guide to help you better understand why bindings are so important and how they work - and to help you find the right binding for your snowboard, riding style and needs.

We'll answer the question, "What's important when choosing a binding?" so that you can find your perfect snowboard binding with us.

A quick summary beforehand: the higher priced bindings are generally better padded, have a softer cushioning system, straps as well as an ergonomic spoiler, etc. Beyond that, of course, you're paying for performance and durability. An aluminum base plate, buckles and spoilers made of urethane are of course more than the plastic equivalent - and therefore more expensive. High-quality materials respond more directly to your movements and are much more reliable. An uncomfortable fixation, on the other hand, quickly causes painful pressure points on the straps and also quickly hinders blood flow, which can become a nightmare on descents. So it may well be appropriate to fork out a few euros more and in return have a good feeling on your feet all day long. If you only snowboard a few days a year, you may not care.  If, on the other hand, you are one of those riders who venture out on the snow several weeks a year, you definitely don't want blisters and calluses on your feet. If you have any questions after our guide, you can always contact us by mail or phone.

 

What are the different elements of a snowboard binding?

 

HIGHBACK SPOILER

 

Buckles

You can easily and practically close the binding with a ratchet system. In most cases, a few hand movements are enough for a secure hold of your snowboard boot. The material selection is quite large and ranges from the simple plastic buckle for entry-level models to aluminum or magnesium buckles for

The Highback (Spoiler): The highback is the vertical plate behind the bottom of your calf.

It supports you in turns and transfers your power to the board.

The spoiler is available in different materials and in different heights and flex levels.

Polycarbonate is a common spoiler material and can be made in a variety of ways to provide versatile freestyle freedom. Polycarbonate is an inexpensive but practical material because flex and torsional stiffness can be fine-tuned.

Urethane is a compound that allows extreme torsional flexibility in your highback. These highbacks are typically used in freestyle or jib-oriented bindings, as they allow the binding to flex laterally with the boot while still providing good control.

Carbon is the top material and is mainly used for freeride bindings because of its power and precision. Such a binding offers incredible resonance across the board and will put every bit of energy directly onto the board. Carbon fiber has the added benefit of being much lighter than polycarbonate and urethane.

Generally speaking, shorter and/or softer highbacks work well for freestylers and beginners. They offer great freedom of movement and provide fun and flexible riding.

Higher and stiffer spoilers, on the other hand, are for freeriders and advanced riders. They offer control, precision and responsiveness, but are also physically demanding.

Highback adjustment

To create better edge pressure, there is the option of a forward tilted position. To do this, the spoiler is adjusted so that it is stiffer and the rider bends the knees more. Up to 30° are possible here. The more you adjust the spoiler vertically, the more tolerant your board is and your boots have more freedom.  

The spoiler can also be adjusted vertically. If you align it parallel to the board edge , you get an even more direct power transmission to the heel edge. 

However, there is no right or wrong way to choose a highback. In the end it depends on your personal feeling. Even some freestylers like higher highbacks and powder fans go for the more flexible variant. You are spoiled for choice!

The Heelcup

This is the connection between the highback and the baseplate. The name says it all: it encloses the heel. Some bindings are one-piece and the heel cup is only an extension of the baseplate. In other bindings, it is a separate component and can be adjusted back and forth according to your needs. The heel cup transfers your power to the base, which in turn transfers it to the board. A rigid heel cup is therefore synonymous with great responsiveness.

The Baseplate : It is the soul of any binding, the central element.

The baseplate, often called the "frame", creates the direct link between you and your snowboard. When it comes to the material, there are no limits and you will find baseplates made of plastic as well as aluminum and other metals. The chassis transfers your power quickly and precisely to the, but at the same time absorbs shocks and impacts, for example, when landing, changing or simply accelerating. As with the spoiler, the base plate has a stiffer chassis for responsiveness and control, while a softer chassis promotes tolerance and movement. 

The Footbed : It is part of the chassis and is that part where your foot is embedded.

Footbeds are often cushioned with EVA foam, but you'll find other cushioning systems such as air cushioning among the bindings. The insole absorbs shock, for example, when you land. Sometimes the insole is slightly inclined to create an angle between the ankles, knees and thighs. This way, you'll be as comfortable as possible on the deck and your legs won't get tired as quickly while riding.

Straps:

Most bindings come with two straps: a toe strap and an instep strap. With the ankle straps, you get pretty much the same thing: they enclose the instep keeping your shoe in the right position to transfer power directly to the board. High-quality straps are padded to do this, reducing pressure points and preventing pain.

 

Toe straps, on the other hand, can vary quite a bit:

 

ride_2122_C9_BLACK-9IeUzi9j0Xk7rE

 

 

The classic toe strap lays directly over your toes. Thus, it holds your foot in the footbed. This rather simple construction is outdated and offers a little less security and support than other straps. That's why you don't find it too often anymore.

 

 

836445-002_ZERO_BLACK-CAMO0010

 

 

The Cap Strap is more modern and safer. It wraps around the front of the boot, so in front of your toes and pushes it into the heelcup.

 

 

Flow-NX2-GT-Fusion-Black-at-board-sport-en

 

 

Sometimes you can find bindings with only one wide and large strap instead of two single straps. This variant is used for tail entry bindings. This strap surrounds the entire boot and provides a strong and comfortable hold.

 

 

What types of snowboard bindings are there?

Strap-in snowboard bindings

are still the most popular bindings in the snowboard world. They have two straps , a baseplate and a highback.

You step in from the front and place the snowboard boot on the footbed and the calf against the highback. Tighten the straps and off you go. This system is not the fastest , but it is safe, practical and powerful. Strap bindings can be easily adjusted for riding comfort, for example with spoilers and adjustable soles.

Tail entry bindings

have come onto the market some time ago and really pack a punch with their innovative design. Getting in and out of the bindings is incredibly easy and quick. The highback can be lowered, so you just have to slide into the binding without having to touch the straps. To close the binding, simply pull up the highback and lock it. It only takes a few seconds and you're ready to go. The first few times can be a little tricky, but fast entry bindings will quickly earn you a priceless price. These days, the vast majority of rear-entry bindings are called hybrid bindings, which means you can just as easily use them the classic way.

Step-In Bindings

If you want a quick and easy connection to your snowboard, then the Step-In system is for you. You can step into the binding right off the lift with your clicker boots. Then you hear a click, adjust a lever on the base and you're ready to go. It doesn't get any easier or faster than that.
Please note that the different systems are NOT compatible with each other. 

CLEW - the most innovative snowboard binding combines the advantages of a strap binding with the convenience of a quick and easy step-in system. The CLEW system can be connected to or attached to ANY boot and has its own integrated highback and a handle that can be operated without much effort.

Clew snowboard binding-CLEW-20 liftClew-Snowboardbindung-CLEW-20-11616715_9Clew snowboard binding-CLEW-20

 

 Function-Clew

Which binding is best for which use?

Freestyle snowboard bindings

Freestyle snowboard bindings are generally more flexible, cushioned and have a sloped footbed. They feature a short, asymmetrical spoiler and an emphasis on flex and lightness. The thought behind it: You should have as much mobility as possible. The shorter spoilers are more forgiving and have a soft lateral flex for your presses and holds. Basic rule: the more agile the overall package, the easier your tricks.

Celia_Petrig_Laax_Rohrbacher21_50-1

Freeride snowboard bindings

Freeride bindings are the most powerful of all. They are stiff and precise, and their high highbacks focus on high responsiveness. Designed for punchy riders who care about maximum control. Freeride snowboard bindings are often made of carbon or other stiff materials.

Nitro_Products_Hintertux_Rohrbacher20_45-1

All-mountain bindings/all-round bindings

All-mountain bindings or all-around bindings are a mix between freestyle and freeride bindings. Not too soft and not too firm, but with a medium flex, so you can take a spin through the powder in the morning and then have a fat session in the park. A favorite playground these bindings do not have. On both hard and soft snow, the combo bindings perform and are true multi-taskers. You are not limited by your binding in your riding style!

Dominik_Wagner_Flachauwinkl_Rohrbacher21_152

Flex of snowboard bindings

In snowboarding, we often talk about "flex" or "stiffness" in terms of equipment. In snowboard bindings, flex represents the mobility of the materials used and the construction of the binding. Ultimately, the combination of these influences whether your binding is either soft, medium or hard.

Soft - Flex Level 1-4

Softer snowboard bindings are made of more flexible materials, e.g. plastic,  and are ideal for any beginner, as they are more forgiving of mistakes due to their higher flexibility. A more flexible highback allows the rider to perform heelside turns more easily. For freestyle and jibber riding, softer bindings are often suitable for several reasons - firstly, as these bindings are more forgiving of mistakes, especially on bigger landings, and secondly, the high flexibility opens up more opportunities to perform presses and grabs.

Medium - Flex Level 4-7

Medium bindings are the all-rounder. Whether advanced snowboarder who appreciates the extra support for stability and better control, or all-mountain rider who appreciates the unlimited versatility in terms of the field of application and riding style offers the medium-stiff bindings. An aggressive freestyler and jibber seize the opportunity to go above and beyond and get brilliant feedback from the binding.

Stiff - Flex Level 7-10

If you love fast pistes and carving, then you appreciate the precise control and fast responsiveness of stiff bindings. The binding transfers your movements quickly and efficiently to your board. You have a secure grip and can go full on the edge. Generally, equipment with a harder flex is suitable in the terrain.

 

Which binding is compatible with my snowboard?

Most snowboards use one of two systems. There is the 2x4 and the 4x4 insert system for your bindings.

At brettsport.de all boards, boots and bindings are compatible with each other. We only sell components that match each other, so you can enjoy your sport. If you are unsure or have any concerns about compatibility, just give us a call or send an email to info@brettsport.de

2x4 binding system

The 2x4 system is probably the most used on the market and compatible for almost all bindings.
Here the 2 cm stands for the vertical distance between each insert. The 4 cm for the lateral distance between two insert rows. A deck in the 2x4 system usually contains 12 inserts for each foot.

4x4 binding system

Then there is the 4x4 system which is similar to the 2x4 system and is built on the same principle.
You can position the disc of your binding over the holes as you wish, usually choosing 8 inserts per foot.

How do I choose the right binding size for my snowboard binding?

Snowboard bindings are available in sizes - Small S / M, Medium M / L Large L / XL etc. It is important that you choose the right size for your boots. Manufacturers sometimes give more specific information in CM or MM. It's best to read through the size information on the respective product page. We try to provide as much information as possible. Sometimes it is also worthwhile to look at the manufacturer's size chart at the manufacturer directly.

After you have checked the manufacturer's size chart, you should check whether the binding fits your shoe size.

Now when you have the binding and boot in front of you, put your shoe in the binding as if you were strapping yourself in. The boot should not hang out of the binding excessively, the straps should not be painfully tightened and should not have any slack left. If the strap does not reach the ratchet , it may need to be adjusted - the binding straps can be adjusted on either side to center the strap on the shoe.

The heel should sit firmly in the binding.
With a properly adjusted binding, the boot should be able to flex, but not wobble.
If you have comfortable boots that fit well in the binding with no slack, you've made a good choice.

bindings_snowboard

Please remember: Any recommendations for specific styles or terrains and rider levels are only guides that you can use as a guide, but they don't necessarily apply to you. Some freeriders appreciate mobility and prefer a binding where they are willing to compromise on precision. And some freestylers, on the other hand, want a responsive binding. Snowboarding is all about the personal feeling on your feet. Our tip : If possible, just try concepts before buying bindings and see if a softer, stiffer or medium is better

 

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