Jones Snowboards

JONES MISSION: Developing innovative mountain gear that sets performance standards, and leadership in the areas of sustainability in production and environmental protection.

Snowboard pioneer and freeride legend Jeremy Jones founded the brand Jones 2009 with one goal in mind: To produce the ultimate snowboarding equipment that balances unmatched performance and durability with industry-leading sustainable manufacturing practices. The clarity and inspiration felt in the mountains is essential to all the products Jones creates. Jones Snowboards and all other Jones products reflect endless winters, first descents, and weeks spent camping under the stars and on the peaks. 

Jones Snowboard specializes in high performance, sustainably made snowboards as well as splitboards and makes snowboards for all terrains and riding styles. The Snowboard Flagship is probably Jones' best-known snowboard and is considered one of the best freeride snowboards on the market. 

From flexible freeride snowboards for all conditions to freestyle decks and surf-inspired pow sticks, Jones mission is to design the ultimate boards for every riding style, combining performance and durability with industry-leading sustainable production methods.

To find your perfect Jones board, read below: [read more]

JONES MISSION: Developing innovative mountain gear that sets performance standards, and leadership in the areas of sustainability in production and environmental protection. Snowboard... learn more »
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Jones Snowboards

JONES MISSION: Developing innovative mountain gear that sets performance standards, and leadership in the areas of sustainability in production and environmental protection.

Snowboard pioneer and freeride legend Jeremy Jones founded the brand Jones 2009 with one goal in mind: To produce the ultimate snowboarding equipment that balances unmatched performance and durability with industry-leading sustainable manufacturing practices. The clarity and inspiration felt in the mountains is essential to all the products Jones creates. Jones Snowboards and all other Jones products reflect endless winters, first descents, and weeks spent camping under the stars and on the peaks. 

Jones Snowboard specializes in high performance, sustainably made snowboards as well as splitboards and makes snowboards for all terrains and riding styles. The Snowboard Flagship is probably Jones' best-known snowboard and is considered one of the best freeride snowboards on the market. 

From flexible freeride snowboards for all conditions to freestyle decks and surf-inspired pow sticks, Jones mission is to design the ultimate boards for every riding style, combining performance and durability with industry-leading sustainable production methods.

To find your perfect Jones board, read below:###

Find Your Perfect Board

Finding the perfect board is relatively easy if you know your body size and riding style, and have an understanding of how basic board dimensions affect board performance. Some boards are made to be ridden every day, regardless of conditions, while other models are designed for specific conditions and terrain. Understanding these concepts will help you narrow down your search for the perfect board model and size.

lodge-boys_baker_miller-47

"Daily Driver" vs. "Quiver Board."

If you want or need to ride the same board every day, you need a "daily driver" that can handle variable conditions. For most snowboarders, directional freeride and twin boards with full-size tails and camber underfoot are best for riding day in and day out, even on icy days. If you only ride powder, slush or soft snow, an alternative freeride board with a short tail and surf rocker can also work as your "daily driver".

"Quiver boards" are shred sticks that you'll only ride when conditions are just right for that board's unique performance characteristics. It could be a board for the nipple-deep day, a board for the spring resort, or a dedicated park/pipe board. Jones Alternative Freeride and Surf Series boards are all worthy additions to your quiver. They're not designed to excel in all conditions, but in good conditions they offer top-level performance.

Find the "Daily Driver"

Jeremy Jones explains how to find a ""Daily Driver"" board that will give you the best shredding performance day in and day out.

The Perfect "Quiver

Jeremy Jones explains how to start building a board "Quiverr" that allows you to choose the best board for the day depending on snow conditions and riding style.

 Directional Freeride

Reliable freeride models built for maximum performance off-piste and in challenging terrain. All models feature shape shapes designed for stomp and straightness, and a directional rocker/camber profile for insane float and unmatched edge grip. 

mens-directional-freeride-snowboardsLr05aKNo3VMk5

Directional All-Mountain

Versatile directional twin models for piste, park and powder. Each model features a unique combination of flex, materials and camber profiles fine-tuned for maximum maneuverability and riding stability in all snow conditions. 

mens-directional-all-mountain-snowboardsev4HG0x0Q2JeW

Alternative Freeride

Inspired freeride models that feature unique shapes, camber and SPOON profiles. Designed for the creative freerider looking for a stable and maneuverable snowboard that provides maximum glide and float in all terrain and snow conditions. 

mens-alternative-freeride-snowboards

Surf Series

Progressive surf-inspired snowboards designed by surfboard shapers Chris Christenson and Jeremy Jones. Each model in the collection features a unique shape, flex, rocker and SPOON profile that delivers ultra-fast glide and nimble performance in powder or on the slopes.

mens-surf-series-snowboards

 

Find your perfect board size

Different shapes, different sizes

Not all board shapes are designed to be ridden in the same size.

Directional freeride boards are the longest boards you will ride. Choose the ideal size of a directional freeride board considering your weight and shoe size.

Directional twin boards can be ridden shorter than a directional freeride board, unless you plan to ride the twin shaper in deep snow as well. For pipes and park riding you should choose your Twin 2 - 3 cm shorter than your Directional Freeride board.

Alternative Freeride-Boards are designed to be ridden much shorter than a directional freeride board. You should choose a Hovercraft or Ultracraft 4 - 8 cm shorter than a normal Directional Freeride board.

The models of the Surf-Series have their own size rules. The Storm Chaser should be ridden 6 -13 cm shorter than your freeride size, the Mind Expander 4 -8 cm shorter than your freeride size and the Lone Wolf should be ridden 6 -13 cm longer than your freeride size.

Quick Guide Board Size
Directional Freeride traditional length
Directional twin 2-3 cm shorter
Alternative Freeride 4-8 cm shorter
Storm Chaser 6-13 cm shorter
Mind Expander 4-8 cm shorter
Lone Wolf 6-13 cm longer

Sizing according to the shape

Jeremy breaks down how a board's shape affects the ideal board size in the following video, and describes the initial sizes of several key Jones models: 

Find Your Natural Stance

If only adjusting stance were as simple as flipping a coin, heads or tails, goofy or regular. Finding the best riding position for your size, riding style and snowboard model can be difficult for many snowboarders, even experienced boarders. It's easy to bolt on the binding and go, but it's not quite as easy to understand how the angle and width of the stance affect your ability to turn, carve, stomp or pop on a particular board.

To ride at your highest level, it's up to you to find your "natural" stance. Your natural szance is the one that works best for your individual body characteristics and that enhances your natural ability to do the things on your snowboard that you love to do.

Finding your natural stance may take some experimentation, but if you start those experiments with a solid understanding of stance basics, you should be able to find it quickly.

Goofy or Regular

When you first start snowboarding, the first thing you should decide is whether you're going to ride with a goofy stance (right foot in front) or a regular stance (left foot in front).

Your dominant foot is usually your rear foot, as the rear foot provides power steering. The front foot provides balance and direction and is usually your less dominant foot.

Which foot do you use first to climb stairs? Which foot do you nominally kick a soccer ball with? The answer to these questions is probably your back foot.

It is also very likely that if you have your right foot in front on the longboard, that foot will be in back on the snowboard. 

Goofy-or-Regularv6UEjbeEjN9yI

Find the right stance width

Stance width plays a crucial role in balance and turning ability on a snowboard. There are several different theories on how wide a stance should best be. Which width is best for you depends on your personal preferences. 

Longboard, surf-style riders tend to prefer a narrower stance because it keeps your hips centered and allows you to pivot your weight from edge to edge faster than if your legs were spread wider. Technical freeriders and snowpark riders often prefer a wider stance, which provides more balance when stomping airs and support when you're bombing through rough terrain.

Until you develop a defined preferred riding style, you'll find a slightly wider than shoulder-width stance to be a good starting point. A stance that is slightly wider than shoulder width will provide good stability and a powerful jumping stance. Use the following chart to find a stance width range that is traditionally appropriate for riders of your height.

 

Size Recommended Stance
< 5'1" / 155cm 17-19" / 43-48 cm
5'2"-5'4" / 156-163 cm 19-21" / 48-54 cm
5'5"-5'8" / 164-172 cm 20-22" / 48-56 cm
5'9"-6' / 173-184 cm 21-23" / 53-58 cm
6'1"-6'4" / 185-193 cm 22-24" / 56-61 cm
> 6'4" / 193 cm 23-25" / 58-63.5 cm

 

For most boards, the ideal stance width should be within a few inches of the board's reference stance. The reference stance point is the stance position around which the dimensions of a particular model or board are designed. You can find the reference stance and width dimension on the cover sheet inside the packages. When your bindings are set to the reference stance, you will be positioned with the intended setback relative to the effective edge. The setback varies from 0-3 cm depending on the model.

If you prefer a narrower or wider stance than the reference stance, you must move both bindings in or out by the same number of holes. If you move one binding in and one binding out of the marked reference stance positions, you will ride the same stance width, but you will not be centered in the sidecut of the board. Riding exactly reference stance is actually always ok and shows you the intended board performance.

The maximum stance width of a board model/size is 4 cm (1.6 inches) wider than the reference stance. The minimum stance width  of a board model is 8 cm (3.1 inches) narrower than the reference stance.

Elena High StanceaSIlIUKGCDkbn

 

Find the right stance angle

The angles of the front and rear bindings play a big role in how you can move your body across your snowboard. Your hips and knees align and move in different ways depending on which direction your feet are facing.

It's safe to say that every rider wants their front foot angled toward the board nose. If you angle your front foot toward the nose, you can initiate a turn with pressure  on your front feet. The baseplate of your binding or splitboard hardware will have angle markings that indicate 0-30 degrees in two directions. When you turn your binding toward the nose, you are talking about a positive angle relative to setting your binding to zero. When you set your binding to zero, it will be completely perpendicular to the edge. Most riders will find a forward binding angle of +15-21 degrees to be ideal. For racers and surfers with more of a surf style or strong turn-focused riders, a more aggressive front foot angle (+21 degrees or more) is often common as it opens up your hips to the fall line and allows you to rock deeper toe side turns.

While all riders benefit from angling their front binding toward the nose, there are several different schools of thought regarding the best direction to angle your rear binding. Your personal riding style and anatomy will determine which back binding angle club you belong to. The three back binding angle types are:

Positive / Positive (+/+)

If you lean your front and back bindings toward the nose, you are riding positive/positive (+/+). Riders who ride +/+ usually ride only a few degrees of positive angle in the back binding (+3-6 degrees). When you rotate your back binding slightly toward the nose, it aligns both of your knees in the same plane and makes it easier for you to dive more aggressively into toe-side turns. Riding positive angle on the back foot makes the change more difficult, but the "crossed-up" feeling can be overcome with experience. Riding +/+ angles on directional boards like the Storm Chaser and Lone Wolf is ideal, as these boardshapes are not designed for switch riding.

Jeremy Jones Stance

Positive / Zero (+/0)

When you angle your front binding toward the nose and keep your back binding perpendicular to your edge at zero degrees, you are riding positive/zero (+/0). Setting your back binding to zero is a very common back binding stance angle. Keeping your foot straight across the board allows you to lean into front side carves and ride switch without overloading your knee. Setting your back foot to zero is a good starting point for experimenting with front binding angle and stance width.

Elena High StanceaSIlIUKGCDkbn

Positive / Negative (Duckstance)

When you tilt your front binding to the nose and your back binding to the tail, you are riding positive/negative, also known as " duck stance". Snowpark rippers who ride a lot of switch and freeriders who like to ride a wide stance for more balance often prefer a duck stance. These riders usually only ride a few degrees of negative angle in the back binding (-3 to -6 degrees). This bit of negative angle can drastically stabilize your landings in Switch and help your body look less "crossed-up" when riding Switch.

Ryland-Bell-Stance

A stance or flexible stance?

Some riders find that it is beneficial for them to change their stance depending on what board they are riding. Jeremy Jones is one of those riders. He rides with a positive/positive stance on most boards (including all directional boards in the Surf Series), but switches to a slightly crouched stance when riding a twin board. He also varies his stance width and angle depending on board size. The smaller the board, the narrower his stance.

Other riders find that it is beneficial for them to keep the same stance regardless of board shape or board size. The theory is that this allows them to maintain the stability and positioning over their feet that they are most accustomed to, regardless of how different the board is.

Adjust Back Stance for doe powder days

On deep powder days, it's critical to keep your nose up without your back leg catching on fire. Setting your stance back so your snowboard is set with more nose than tail can definitely help on those deep powder days, especially if you're riding a twin or directional twin shape. Start by setting your stance back 2-5 cm, trying to set both bindings back the same distance from the reference stance.

powder-stance

Experiment and gain experience

Don't worry if you don't find your natural stance right away the first time you set up  a new board. The best strategy is to start with a reference stance width and choose stance angles that traditionally enhance your preferred riding style, +/+ for surf style, +/0 for all-mountain, duck stance for the park. The next time you go out, switch your angles to a different style and watch how it changes your riding skills/style. With just a few shred sessions, you should be close to knowing what setting feels best for you on this board.

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Find Your Perfect Board

Finding the perfect board is relatively easy if you know your body size and riding style, and have an understanding of how basic board dimensions affect board performance. Some boards are made to be ridden every day, regardless of conditions, while other models are designed for specific conditions and terrain. Understanding these concepts will help you narrow down your search for the perfect board model and size.

lodge-boys_baker_miller-47

"Daily Driver" vs. "Quiver Board."

If you want or need to ride the same board every day, you need a "daily driver" that can handle variable conditions. For most snowboarders, directional freeride and twin boards with full-size tails and camber underfoot are best for riding day in and day out, even on icy days. If you only ride powder, slush or soft snow, an alternative freeride board with a short tail and surf rocker can also work as your "daily driver".

"Quiver boards" are shred sticks that you'll only ride when conditions are just right for that board's unique performance characteristics. It could be a board for the nipple-deep day, a board for the spring resort, or a dedicated park/pipe board. Jones Alternative Freeride and Surf Series boards are all worthy additions to your quiver. They're not designed to excel in all conditions, but in good conditions they offer top-level performance.

Find the "Daily Driver"

Jeremy Jones explains how to find a ""Daily Driver"" board that will give you the best shredding performance day in and day out.

The Perfect "Quiver

Jeremy Jones explains how to start building a board "Quiverr" that allows you to choose the best board for the day depending on snow conditions and riding style.

 Directional Freeride

Reliable freeride models built for maximum performance off-piste and in challenging terrain. All models feature shape shapes designed for stomp and straightness, and a directional rocker/camber profile for insane float and unmatched edge grip. 

mens-directional-freeride-snowboardsLr05aKNo3VMk5

Directional All-Mountain

Versatile directional twin models for piste, park and powder. Each model features a unique combination of flex, materials and camber profiles fine-tuned for maximum maneuverability and riding stability in all snow conditions. 

mens-directional-all-mountain-snowboardsev4HG0x0Q2JeW

Alternative Freeride

Inspired freeride models that feature unique shapes, camber and SPOON profiles. Designed for the creative freerider looking for a stable and maneuverable snowboard that provides maximum glide and float in all terrain and snow conditions. 

mens-alternative-freeride-snowboards

Surf Series

Progressive surf-inspired snowboards designed by surfboard shapers Chris Christenson and Jeremy Jones. Each model in the collection features a unique shape, flex, rocker and SPOON profile that delivers ultra-fast glide and nimble performance in powder or on the slopes.

mens-surf-series-snowboards

 

Find your perfect board size

Different shapes, different sizes

Not all board shapes are designed to be ridden in the same size.

Directional freeride boards are the longest boards you will ride. Choose the ideal size of a directional freeride board considering your weight and shoe size.

Directional twin boards can be ridden shorter than a directional freeride board, unless you plan to ride the twin shaper in deep snow as well. For pipes and park riding you should choose your Twin 2 - 3 cm shorter than your Directional Freeride board.

Alternative Freeride-Boards are designed to be ridden much shorter than a directional freeride board. You should choose a Hovercraft or Ultracraft 4 - 8 cm shorter than a normal Directional Freeride board.

The models of the Surf-Series have their own size rules. The Storm Chaser should be ridden 6 -13 cm shorter than your freeride size, the Mind Expander 4 -8 cm shorter than your freeride size and the Lone Wolf should be ridden 6 -13 cm longer than your freeride size.

Quick Guide Board Size
Directional Freeride traditional length
Directional twin 2-3 cm shorter
Alternative Freeride 4-8 cm shorter
Storm Chaser 6-13 cm shorter
Mind Expander 4-8 cm shorter
Lone Wolf 6-13 cm longer

Sizing according to the shape

Jeremy breaks down how a board's shape affects the ideal board size in the following video, and describes the initial sizes of several key Jones models: 

Find Your Natural Stance

If only adjusting stance were as simple as flipping a coin, heads or tails, goofy or regular. Finding the best riding position for your size, riding style and snowboard model can be difficult for many snowboarders, even experienced boarders. It's easy to bolt on the binding and go, but it's not quite as easy to understand how the angle and width of the stance affect your ability to turn, carve, stomp or pop on a particular board.

To ride at your highest level, it's up to you to find your "natural" stance. Your natural szance is the one that works best for your individual body characteristics and that enhances your natural ability to do the things on your snowboard that you love to do.

Finding your natural stance may take some experimentation, but if you start those experiments with a solid understanding of stance basics, you should be able to find it quickly.

Goofy or Regular

When you first start snowboarding, the first thing you should decide is whether you're going to ride with a goofy stance (right foot in front) or a regular stance (left foot in front).

Your dominant foot is usually your rear foot, as the rear foot provides power steering. The front foot provides balance and direction and is usually your less dominant foot.

Which foot do you use first to climb stairs? Which foot do you nominally kick a soccer ball with? The answer to these questions is probably your back foot.

It is also very likely that if you have your right foot in front on the longboard, that foot will be in back on the snowboard. 

Goofy-or-Regularv6UEjbeEjN9yI

Find the right stance width

Stance width plays a crucial role in balance and turning ability on a snowboard. There are several different theories on how wide a stance should best be. Which width is best for you depends on your personal preferences. 

Longboard, surf-style riders tend to prefer a narrower stance because it keeps your hips centered and allows you to pivot your weight from edge to edge faster than if your legs were spread wider. Technical freeriders and snowpark riders often prefer a wider stance, which provides more balance when stomping airs and support when you're bombing through rough terrain.

Until you develop a defined preferred riding style, you'll find a slightly wider than shoulder-width stance to be a good starting point. A stance that is slightly wider than shoulder width will provide good stability and a powerful jumping stance. Use the following chart to find a stance width range that is traditionally appropriate for riders of your height.

 

Size Recommended Stance
< 5'1" / 155cm 17-19" / 43-48 cm
5'2"-5'4" / 156-163 cm 19-21" / 48-54 cm
5'5"-5'8" / 164-172 cm 20-22" / 48-56 cm
5'9"-6' / 173-184 cm 21-23" / 53-58 cm
6'1"-6'4" / 185-193 cm 22-24" / 56-61 cm
> 6'4" / 193 cm 23-25" / 58-63.5 cm

 

For most boards, the ideal stance width should be within a few inches of the board's reference stance. The reference stance point is the stance position around which the dimensions of a particular model or board are designed. You can find the reference stance and width dimension on the cover sheet inside the packages. When your bindings are set to the reference stance, you will be positioned with the intended setback relative to the effective edge. The setback varies from 0-3 cm depending on the model.

If you prefer a narrower or wider stance than the reference stance, you must move both bindings in or out by the same number of holes. If you move one binding in and one binding out of the marked reference stance positions, you will ride the same stance width, but you will not be centered in the sidecut of the board. Riding exactly reference stance is actually always ok and shows you the intended board performance.

The maximum stance width of a board model/size is 4 cm (1.6 inches) wider than the reference stance. The minimum stance width  of a board model is 8 cm (3.1 inches) narrower than the reference stance.

Elena High StanceaSIlIUKGCDkbn

 

Find the right stance angle

The angles of the front and rear bindings play a big role in how you can move your body across your snowboard. Your hips and knees align and move in different ways depending on which direction your feet are facing.

It's safe to say that every rider wants their front foot angled toward the board nose. If you angle your front foot toward the nose, you can initiate a turn with pressure  on your front feet. The baseplate of your binding or splitboard hardware will have angle markings that indicate 0-30 degrees in two directions. When you turn your binding toward the nose, you are talking about a positive angle relative to setting your binding to zero. When you set your binding to zero, it will be completely perpendicular to the edge. Most riders will find a forward binding angle of +15-21 degrees to be ideal. For racers and surfers with more of a surf style or strong turn-focused riders, a more aggressive front foot angle (+21 degrees or more) is often common as it opens up your hips to the fall line and allows you to rock deeper toe side turns.

While all riders benefit from angling their front binding toward the nose, there are several different schools of thought regarding the best direction to angle your rear binding. Your personal riding style and anatomy will determine which back binding angle club you belong to. The three back binding angle types are:

Positive / Positive (+/+)

If you lean your front and back bindings toward the nose, you are riding positive/positive (+/+). Riders who ride +/+ usually ride only a few degrees of positive angle in the back binding (+3-6 degrees). When you rotate your back binding slightly toward the nose, it aligns both of your knees in the same plane and makes it easier for you to dive more aggressively into toe-side turns. Riding positive angle on the back foot makes the change more difficult, but the "crossed-up" feeling can be overcome with experience. Riding +/+ angles on directional boards like the Storm Chaser and Lone Wolf is ideal, as these boardshapes are not designed for switch riding.

Jeremy Jones Stance

Positive / Zero (+/0)

When you angle your front binding toward the nose and keep your back binding perpendicular to your edge at zero degrees, you are riding positive/zero (+/0). Setting your back binding to zero is a very common back binding stance angle. Keeping your foot straight across the board allows you to lean into front side carves and ride switch without overloading your knee. Setting your back foot to zero is a good starting point for experimenting with front binding angle and stance width.

Elena High StanceaSIlIUKGCDkbn

Positive / Negative (Duckstance)

When you tilt your front binding to the nose and your back binding to the tail, you are riding positive/negative, also known as " duck stance". Snowpark rippers who ride a lot of switch and freeriders who like to ride a wide stance for more balance often prefer a duck stance. These riders usually only ride a few degrees of negative angle in the back binding (-3 to -6 degrees). This bit of negative angle can drastically stabilize your landings in Switch and help your body look less "crossed-up" when riding Switch.

Ryland-Bell-Stance

A stance or flexible stance?

Some riders find that it is beneficial for them to change their stance depending on what board they are riding. Jeremy Jones is one of those riders. He rides with a positive/positive stance on most boards (including all directional boards in the Surf Series), but switches to a slightly crouched stance when riding a twin board. He also varies his stance width and angle depending on board size. The smaller the board, the narrower his stance.

Other riders find that it is beneficial for them to keep the same stance regardless of board shape or board size. The theory is that this allows them to maintain the stability and positioning over their feet that they are most accustomed to, regardless of how different the board is.

Adjust Back Stance for doe powder days

On deep powder days, it's critical to keep your nose up without your back leg catching on fire. Setting your stance back so your snowboard is set with more nose than tail can definitely help on those deep powder days, especially if you're riding a twin or directional twin shape. Start by setting your stance back 2-5 cm, trying to set both bindings back the same distance from the reference stance.

powder-stance

Experiment and gain experience

Don't worry if you don't find your natural stance right away the first time you set up  a new board. The best strategy is to start with a reference stance width and choose stance angles that traditionally enhance your preferred riding style, +/+ for surf style, +/0 for all-mountain, duck stance for the park. The next time you go out, switch your angles to a different style and watch how it changes your riding skills/style. With just a few shred sessions, you should be close to knowing what setting feels best for you on this board.

.

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